Karate - Budo  
  The key features and principles for understanding karate  
 

karaté

 
   
  >> Stage karaté Vincenzo Figuccio 19-21 mai - Belgique english français
Contents
Introduction: shu ha ri
 
  Introduction
  History
  Styles of karate
  Aims of karate
  Kihon, kata, kumite
  Physical principes
  Bunkai
  Combat
  Aggression and stress
  Kumite in pratice
  Dangerous spots
  Japan, Buddhism & Zen
  Karate and emptiness
  Precepts
  Quotations
  Conclusions
  References
  Author
  Contact
  The book
   
Annexes
    JKA
    Shotokan kata
    Shitoryu kata
    Goju-ryu kata
    Kumite
    Takedown & MMA
    Physical training
    Links

 

 

Karate is much more than a simple combat sport. Rich and complex, it is a martial art of Japanese origin. Keeping the Japanese terms and usages gives the art a touch of exoticism and surrounds it with an aura of mystery. In reality, however, karate is rational and pragmatic: it is based on experience and an empiricism that is many centuries old.

These pages present a non-exhaustive summary of learning and thinking accumulated through courses and reading. They are no substitute for lessons given in a dojo, which is the only place where one can truly learn karate. Because, although it is an art that provokes thinking, first and foremost karate is something that must be experienced.

In Japanese fencing, Shu Ha Ri represents the three phases designed to lead to mastery of the art:
Shu is the first phase, in which we learn through patient obedience;
Ha is the second step, in which we endeavour to understand the system;
Ri, the third phase, consists of mastering the art and separating from the system.

The aim of these pages is situated at the level of Ha: understanding the essence of karate and its principles. To achieve this, we will examine the martial art from different perspectives, including its history, physics, anatomy, physiology, psychology and philosophy.